Write-up: solution to a RE crackme

CTFs and challenges mainly based on reverse engineering are a bit uncommon, so when I find one I am always happy to devote some time to try and solve it. This write-up will be on the crackme created by hasherezade. To make the reading more spicy I decided to explain my thought process while going through the challenge, instead of writing a plain (boring) solution.

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Getting your hands on the "micro kernel" of NotPetya

As everyone in the infosec community, I wanted to get my hands on the latest malware case, the infamous NotPetya, EternalPetya, WhateveryouwantPetya. Let me start with a disclamer: I am completely out the naming debate, but for the sake of my mental health I will call it NotPetya from now on. There are already a lot of in-depth technical analysis of this malware, so I do not want to waste time writing down things that you can find elsewhere. As an example I’ll leave here the links to a couple of interesting reads on the topic:

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Need a malware? No problem, I'll put it on pastebin

We can find many different means for malwares to spread: just to name a couple, the evergreen of email spam, with that nasty invoice.pdf.exe attachment, or some Viagra malvertising leading to an Exploit Kit. But malware authors also look for more “unusual” ways to move around their products. A very interesting one is pastebin, the well-known service to quickly distribute chunks of text online. The idea of monitoring pastebin comes from sudosev, who proposed to look for Base64 encodings of Windows executables (i.e. PE files) among the content that goes through pastebin. To achieve this goal he used used pastemonitor: the name is self-explanatory, this service stores pastes and allows the user to look for specific strings or regular expressions. sev perfomed the analysis manually, so I decided to take his very good idea and automatize it.

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When monkeys create ransomwares

2016 has been a year full of ransomwares, and the trend doesn’t seem to change in the new year. Many “sophisticated” pieces of malware have been developed, from Locky, to Cerber, to the more recent Spora. But in the wild sometimes strange examples of wannabe-ransomware can appear, as the one we will look at here. Actually I’m writing this post just to make some fun of this script-kiddie masterpiece, so do not expect any obscure technique or advanced feature presented here.

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